Linfield University

Assistant Professor of Theatre Studies, Fall 2017 – present

1810_29_LindseyMantoan_Class-0052

THTR 270: Play Reading and Analysis
Directed reading of classical and contemporary plays. Provides an introduction to dramatic literature and various approaches to play analysis. Various taught with themes of gender and sexuality, or racial justice. 3 credits.

THTR 299: War Stories: From Hamilton to Hunger Games
Examination of representations of war through cultural objects, with particular attention to how we think about war and how we understand humanity, morality, honor, identity, our past, and our future. Focus on questions of representation (what do battles look like?), aesthetic technique, genre, history, and narrative. 4 credits.

THTR 375/MUSC 375: History of the Broadway Musical
Historical, theatrical, musical, and movement analysis of Broadway musical theatre. Focus on plot, character, musical style, and movement. Examination of the ways race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, and ability are represented and investigated in musicals. Offered spring of even-numbered years. 4 credits.

THTR 399: This is America: Law, Culture and Identity in the United States
Explores the question “what is the United States?” through study of its laws, culture (theater, performance, film, television, and music videos), and historic events. 4 credits.

THTR 470: Theatre History and Literature I
The development of Western and major non-Western theatre traditions to the 1700s, including sociological, philosophical, and cultural foundations of each major period and aesthetic movement; dramatic literature; physical stage, and production techniques. 4 credits.

THTR 473: Theatre History and Literature II
Investigates the development of world theatre traditions from 1700 to the present, including sociological and cultural foundations of each major period and aesthetic movement. 4 credits.

INQS 125-16: Witches, Big Bad Wolves, and Reimagined Fairy Tales
One of the first ways children learn to make sense of the world around them is through stories—often, fairy tales. These narratives get reinvented over and over again and examining different interpretations can help us understand how we as individuals and cultures have changed. This course examines how representations of race, gender, sexuality, class, age, nation, and power evolve by looking at reimagined fairy tales such as Wicked, Once Upon a Time, and Mulan. 4 credits.

INQS 125 09: War Stories: From Hamilton to Hunger Games
Examination of representations of war through cultural objects, with particular attention to how we think about war and how we understand humanity, morality, honor, identity, our past, and our future. Focus on questions of representation (what do battles look like?), aesthetic technique, genre, history, and narrative. 4 credits.

COMM 420: Political and Protest Performance in the US
According to Augusto Boal, author of Theatre of the Oppressed, “All theater is necessarily political.” In this course, we examine plays and performances in the United States that address social, economic, and political issues, from AIDS to labor to war. We’ll read plays, examine the theatricality of political protests and politicians’ performances, and develop our own political performances. Evaluating political theater inevitably raises questions of efficacy: we’ll also delve into what counts as a “successful” political performance, asking how we might take an expansive approach to understanding impact and change. 3 credits.

IDST 007-10
Focuses on the transition to Linfield’s liberal arts environment, the resources of the Linfield community, and the process of setting goals and making intentional decisions.


Student Feedback

This was one of my favorite classes at Linfield and one of the only classes I’ve taken where students were able to engage with the material in really personal and relevant ways, rather than through purely scholarly articles or historical analysis. The professor was very approachable, the material and structure were extremely engaging, and the class allowed students to enthusiastically indulge in a personal interest through an academic and analytic lens (Spring 2020, The History of the Broadway Musical).

In a week, we effectively experienced more “discussions, demonstrations, hands-on learning, simulations, labs, studio, presentations, textbook/articles, videos, online activities, simulations, etc.” than many courses provide in a year. One of the only professors […] willing to discuss the complicated dynamics of gender/race/injustices in a matter of fact way. Also made me feel comfortable that if I put my foot in my mouth while sharing/processing an idea, that I wouldn’t be condemned as insensitive (Fall 17, Political and Protest Performance in the US).

Gave the best feedback on written work that I have received (Fall 17, Political and Protest Performance in the US).

This class was wonderful and our community within it was excellent. I loved going to this class, I felt like I learned so much and my voice was always heard. I will miss this class so much. It definitely contributed to my critical analysis skills (Spring 18, The History of the Broadway Musical).

This was by far one of the best classes I’ve had at my experience with Linfield. Professor Mantoan is a wonderful teacher who manages her class well and really helps students  with their writing (Spring 18, War Stories From Hamilton to Hunger Games).

 

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